Anne Crumpacker

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FIRST WEDNESDAY RECEPTION February 1, 6-8 pm

Anne Crumpacker’s work interweaves scale and proportion—thin, medium and thick crosscut bamboo sections, the interplay of light and shadow—to create living topographies. Her long immersion in Japanese aesthetics guides her as she works intuitively, following a path of discovery.

makelikeIn developing the crosscut bamboo technique, she is contributing a new approach to a venerable material. Deconstructing bamboo into crosscut slices reveals its cellular makeup and illuminates its natural beauty and strength. Assembling the pieces allows patterns and rhythms to emerge that reflect the interconnection of forces in nature, from microscopic life to wave movement.

Crumpacker has been a student of Ikebana for over 15 years. Her passion for travel, exploration and learning has taken her throughout Asia, Europe, Africa and South America. She credits experiences in Japan as a profound influence on her art and life. Crumpacker’s work interweaves scale and proportion-thin, medium and thick crosscut bamboo sections, the interplay of light and shadow-to create living topographies. Her long immersion in Japanese aesthetics guides her work intuitively, following a path of discovery. To learn more about Anne Crumpacker and see more images of her bamboo sculpture, please visit her website. 


Anne holds a bachelor of arts from Scripps College and a master of arts in liberal studies from Reed College, as well as a teaching credential from University of California, Berkeley. She is a member of the first graduating class of the MFA program in Applied Craft and Design from Oregon College of Art and Craft + Pacific Northwest College of Art.

Posted on 02/01 at 10:14 AM